Filtering by Category: my work

updated statement

Added on by Jourdan.
Evocations of the flesh - in material, form, and manner - signify a meeting point for dualisms of all sorts. My studio practice is rooted in the notion that a richness can be found in the blurry space between alternatives: what is there formed by what is not, and what is not there formed by what is. I like to invert and/or blur the boundaries between these two states in attempts to evoke feelings of familiar ambiguity, comfortable tension, and reluctant desire.

Skin is a barrier, a wall, denoting interior from exterior (subject from object), yet it’s full of its own physical intricacies, hollows and bumps that muddle those very distinctions. Just as the material of our bodies is made up of many layers, so too are the flesh's various associations. A subtle surreality is evoked, whereby the flesh functions simultaneously on physical, psychological, metaphorical, and metaphysical levels.

My work is influenced by an existential understanding of holes, which is rooted in an ontological (and thus pre-sexual) desire to fill voids. While the Freudian model speaks of an “original” hole that renders subsequent holes only metaphors, the existentialists suggest that, in a sense, all holes plead obscurely to be filled. They are appeals to the triumph of the full over the empty, of existence over nothingness. 

Thus the physical finds its parallel in the spiritual: the body functions as a microcosm, continually giving glimpses into the beyond. Flesh acts as a tangible metaphor - at once a barrier and a carrier of matter and meaning.

hair cuts

Added on by Jourdan.


Since starting to mess around with hair extensions and wigs in the studio, I've been reminded of these cut-out locks of hair stashed in my collage materials - I started cutting them out a while back, but never really found a use for them. But now it seems entirely appropriate. I like the loaded simplicity of them. 

most recent assessment of my work...

Added on by Jourdan.

In attempts to articulate why I make the things I do, I shall begin by breaking things down into a few over-arching (and overlapping) categories. I should note, however, that the idea of categorical distinctions comes up quite frequently in my work - particularly in my desire to make works that simultaneously acknowledge and abolish such distinctions and the tensions therein. Nonetheless, I shall break things down, if only to weave them back together once more. 

Three primary influences on my studio practice include biology, psychology, and theology. Each area of study functions on its own level yet all three find a common denominator in my work. They do so particularly in my dealings with the flesh, which signifies for me a meeting point for dualisms of all sorts. Flesh is a barrier, a wall, denoting interior from exterior (subject from object), yet it’s full of its own physical intricacies, hollows and bumps that muddle those very distinctions. The flesh is also the toughest and most sensitive of organs, a vessel through which we experience both the most painful and most pleasurable of sensations. I choose to work with the flesh because it’s what we all know best – it is a charged imagery to which every bodied being can relate on some level, be it physical, metaphorical, or metaphysical. “Man is the meeting point of two worlds.” (Nikolas Berdyaev)

My studio practice is rooted in the notion that a richness can be found in the blurry space between alternatives. Opposites exist, yes, but very rarely do we find them in isolation of the other. One may only exit a space, if first it is entered. A cup may only be emptied, if first it is filled. Relational verbs such as these are defined by their opposites and couldn’t exist without the other. “What is not there formed by what is. What is there formed by what is not.” (Bruce Hainley)

Herein lies the significance of casting processes in my work: positives shapes and negative spaces, constantly informing one another. I like to invert and/or blur the boundaries between these two states in attempts to evoke feelings of familiar ambiguity, comfortable tension, and reluctant desire.

Though I’m quite willing to acknowledge that the gaping orifices and protuberances in my work may become imbued with a certain pycho-sexuality, I’m much more interested in the existential opinion that the Freudian model is merely a localization of an original, ontological (and pre-sexual) fascination with holes. While the Freudian model speaks of an “original” hole that renders subsequent holes only metaphors, the existential model suggests that, in a sense, all holes plead obscurely to be filled. They are appeals to the triumph of the full over the empty, of existence over nothingness.

This recalls a symbolic notion of lack (“manqué”), which Jacques Lacan suggests is the root of all desire. C.S. Lewis speaks of a similar yearning to which he refers by the German word “sehnsucht.” He echoes both existentialists and theologians past when he admits, “If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for an other world.”

Søren Kierkegaard’s Christian existentialism suggests that the universe is fundamentally paradoxical and that its greatest paradox is in the transcendent union of God and man in the person of Jesus Christ. Not one or the other, but both. Opposite, yet the same. Now, but not yet. Christian theology (religiosity aside) is made up of conflicting, colliding, and coalescing alternatives that find their resolve in the oneness of Christ. 

Thus physical oneness becomes a metaphor for spiritual oneness. Flesh acts as a metaphor, but is tangible nonetheless- at once a barrier and a carrier of both matter and meaning.

1/2 way to MFA

Added on by Jourdan.
sketches/experiments/castings,/etc.
Here are some shots from my studio post-critique. It feels good to have things cleaned up a bit. Most things are in progress... I'm waiting on some more beef intestines to come in so I can finish that sculpture a few photos down. I love how thick the beef guts are compared to the pig ones! They're also more stinky!! My final crit went pretty well... there was a lot of talk about materiality... how are my materials furthering my concepts? How can I be more intentional/deliberate about every little thing? Every material comes with its own baggage... and the thought of that can be slightly paralyzing at times. But I'm up for the challenge! 

my laboratory 

a new approach - made of chicken wire, paper mache, plaster, fiberglass insulation and resin

some new collages - much more labor intensive than the others
my office
some books I'm reading/thinking about
I'm working on a more concise artist's statement (that was actually due yesterday...) - I've got a lot I'm trying to articulate... more on that in the very near future...

mount

Added on by Jourdan.

There's something odd about this one...  but in a good way (I think). The pink part was just a piece I chopped off of another sculpture - I literally just hung it on the wall as is and stuffed some hair behind it... it's like a weird head/face/bust - kind of like a deer head mount or something of that sort. It watches me when I'm working at my desk!


Call Collect

Added on by Jourdan.
Squirkle - 2012 - pvc, fiberglass insulation, cast & pigmented water putty, hot glue, animal hair, and hog intestines
This little guy is on view at Hamiltonian Gallery as part of their annual benefit exhibition, Call Collect. Myself and about 100 other local artists were invited to donate small works for the cause. See the online catalogue HERE! There will be a closing reception on Friday, November 9th, from 7-9pm...



studio/laboratory

Added on by Jourdan.
Today was a great day in the studio. Uninterrupted play. The best kind of work, right?
sponge, pvc, condoms, and wasabi peas

hair, pvc, fiberglass insulation, hog intestines, cast & tinted water putty, and hot glue




This guy is getting re-vamped... it's only the beginning!

squirk

Added on by Jourdan.

I've had assemblage on the brain lately. These little guys are my quirky attempt. I'm still not really sure how I feel about them yet, but I think they might be headed somewhere...

fiberglass insulation, polyurethane, balloon, great stuff, cast plaster, and rubber bands

fiberglass insulation, polyurethane, balloon, hot glue, and rubber band

cast aluminum, fiberglass insulation, polyurethane,balloon, and hog intestines

fiberglass insulation, polyurethane, cast plaster, and rubber band
hot glue, paper, cast water putty, and rubber bands

fiberglass insulation, hog intestines, zip ties, cast plaster, and hot glue



assemblages on paper

Added on by Jourdan.
I'm hoping these 2.5D works might translate into some 3D (in the round) assemblages... at this point the paper is merely a ground on which the items collide. How can I better engage my surface? And if I'm not engaging it, why have one at all? These start to remind me of little critters...
polyurethane, hair, string, and pig intestines on 17" x 14" paper 
polyurethane, hair, fiberglass insulation, and pig intestines on 17" x 14" paper 
polyurethane, hair, string, and pig intestines on 17" x 14" paper 

studio freshness

Added on by Jourdan.
Last week I moved back into my super fresh, new and improved studio space. Can't believe what a difference this is from last year... and I thought I was in studio heaven THEN! Can you believe it's the same space?!
BEFORE

Now we're really talking. The walls are a good 2 ft. taller and the floors are all smooth. So much better all around.  Here are some snapshots of some new things I've been working on.
wire, paper, fiberglass insulation, pig intestines, polycrylic, and hair
polyurethane, hair, string, and pig intestines on paper