Filtering by Category: pink

franz west: hello & goodbye

Added on by Jourdan.

I've somehow been missing the incredible sculptures of Franz West - where have I been?? Someone mentioned his work the other day, in response to the piece I'm working on (and I can certainly see why) - and I didn't think to look him up until just now. And in doing so, I discovered that he died... yesterday. Darn. Well, I love his sculptures... I must learn more about this guy!


the spider, the mistress, and the tangerine

Added on by Jourdan.

 Louise Bourgeois has been on mind a lot lately. Some of the things I'm working on right now are unmistakeably derived from her work (even if unconsciously so). I saw a large installation of her work this winter at DIA Beacon and was blown away. I was literally crawling on the floor to see things from every possible angle. Wow - what a sculptor! It's not easy to find images online that even come close to doing her work justice, but here are a few that I've been looking at...

 
Yesterday I watched a really nice documentary on Louise Bourgeois called The Spider, the Mistress and the Tangerine. I highly recommend it!

While I was at Elsewhere, I had a Louise Bourgeois moment (hehe). Maybe one day I might come close to being as cool as she is?


hannah wilke

Added on by Jourdan.
ceramic
Hannah Wilke came up in my crit with Frances Barth this morning. I'm familiar with her later work (the documentation of her body's demise), but not so much with her more formal sculpture. I like very much! must learn more...
artist's hair on paper

of the flesh: gestation station

Added on by Jourdan.

An odd pre-existing fascination with all things flesh magnetically drew me to the dolls. Their naked pinkness piled high in the Toynado detritus just begging to be touched, but in the subtlest and most pitiful of ways. Dolls are meant to be played with. They are mini fake humans designed for imaginative interactions. But the dolls I discovered had been hidden away from sight for quite some time. Their dismembered limbs gathering dust in the corner – a morbid mass grave for playthings of the past.

In such a place as Elsewhere, a living museum, a breathing organ of objects always in flux, nothing, no matter how beaten and broken, deserves to be hidden away. My project has been a joint attempt to enliven both the dolls and the place in which I’ve chosen to install them – formerly known as the hotel lobby – an underutilized light-filled area on the 2nd floor at the front of the building. This space will now function as both lounge and creative work area, a space for gestation and growth of all kinds.

One of the many reasons I am so drawn to the flesh as both material and metaphor in my work is because of its regenerative qualities and capabilities. It serves as protector and barrier from outside dangers, as well as our primary sense organ, allowing us to feel and respond to the world around us. In this project, I have endeavored to work and play with the doll parts, the imitation flesh, to enliven it so that it may mimic human flesh not only in form, but also in manner, fostering growth of new projects and ideas.

The dolls have said goodbye to their old lives as objects and playthings. Their individual identities have been dissolved in attempt to further a collective consciousness, a collaborative ascension that is equally weird, hopeful, playful, and macabre. As their parts rearrange and flow in unexpected formations, viewers are encouraged to explore with child-like curiosity and discovery.



furniture rehab

Added on by Jourdan.
The chairs that I wanted to use in my installation were pretty beat up when I found them. (too bad I don't have before shots) I'm always reluctant to sit in yucky chairs... who isn't? I wanted this space to be cozy and welcoming, which meant that I HAD to do something about the chairs. Here are my 2 solutions...
For this one I sewed up the holes with fleshy ribbons. I think they look sort of like fresh scars.
And I painted this one. I didn't know that was a possibility, but Meghan suggested it - she had never tried it, but had seen it done on Trading Spaces, ha. Before it was a VERY dingy grayish off-white muslin... yuck! Learn how to paint upholstery here.

tower/plug

Added on by Jourdan.

I've completed my most recent endeavor - a tower of sorts. Earlier this semester, I built a similar sculpture that resulted in a charred studio and headaches for all. After much hesitation, I decided to re-build the piece (though it turned out quite different). This time I built a sturdier inner armature of steel (last time I used cardboard boxes) and eliminated the oil-based polyurethane thought to be the main culprit of the flash fire. This one is a real mash-up of textures and materials. Can you guess what all I used? 

Though it started out as more of a formal/material process driven piece, this sculpture has come to embody a lot of the concepts that have been driving my studio practice over the past few months. I've been reading some stuff by Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, and Georges Battaille - all dealing with kind of kooky psycho-sexual subject matter that could also potentially be read into my work. In this piece, there's definitely an aspect of desire... Rococo in style, cake-like in form - but the allusions to the body/flesh make it equally as yucky (pussy, oozy, etc.). So it exists somewhere in between. Desire and disgust. What interests me most is how these two distinctions don't/can't exist on their own. There's often something kind of disgusting about desire, right? Eating a cake this big would make anyone throw up on the spot. And vice versa... like squeezing a ripe and ready blemish... how something that's extremely disgusting by nature somehow elicits such an odd sense of satisfaction.

Another idea I'm thinking about in this piece is Lacan's theory of "lack" (or "manque" in French), which suggests that desire always arises out of lack.  I've not studied this material in depth, but I like where it is heading and think it's quite relevant in respect to my current body work. There are other things I could try to explain, but I think I'll stop stop here.





Materials include fiberglass insulation (pink and yellow), urethane spray foam ("great stuff"), balloons (white, clear, and pink), hot glue (of varying tones), caulk (of varying tones and textures), landscaping fabric, joint compound, string, water putty, silly string, and more!

This sculpture will spend the summer at Montpelier Art Center for their 31st Annual Invitational Sculpture Exhibition! The show opens on June 7th and will be up through mid-August. 

aziz+cucher

Added on by Jourdan.
Contradition is so much a part of this project. The inside is made of an exterior, the self is made an other, the outside becomes enmeshed within, and the body becomes enmeshed with its surroundings. Like an animal that can camouflage itself in its natural environment, the artists have described the Interiors  to be about a subject “incapable of demarcating the boundaries of its own body…[a subject] lost in the immensity that surrounds it”.
 From "Aziz + Cucher: Landscapes and Interiors" by Cay Sophie Rabinowitz



tower of terror

Added on by Jourdan.
fiberglass insulation, foam insulation, landscaping fabric, polyurethane, and hotglue
6' x 2' x 2'









So... this guy went up in flames last night. We're assuming it spontaneously combusted (there were some polyurethane soaked layers) because there appears to be no other reasonable explanation. My studio was/is an utter mess and the surrounding studios received a great deal of water damage. Thank goodness nobody was hurt... it could've been a lot worse.

I'm going to have to adjust my process and way of working with materials from here on out. I'm not sure what that's going to mean exactly, but I suppose I'm up for the challenge... as if I had a choice.

layers of something

Added on by Jourdan.
In attempts to "loosen up" (as I've been advised to do), I ventured to create these small layered pieces. They were each made in one sitting, and the materials were chosen quickly and at random (though with regard to aesthetic). I've been looking/thinking a lot about the many layers of the flesh and likening them to the layers of the earth. While one is super microscopic and zoomed in, the other is zoomed out, and neither of which are typically seen with the naked eye. I'm interested in exploring this idea of scaleless-ness and how it relates to both our bodies and our environments - what's inside of our skin, as well as what's outside of it.

Now, in attempts to loosen up some more, I plan to continue working in a similar way, but straying away from the safety and comfort that I find in the cube/rectangle...


materials include: pink and yellow fiberglass insulation, pink foam insulation, urethane foam, polyurethane, hotglue, and landscaping fabric

more on wim delvoye

Added on by Jourdan.
I've always had a soft spot for some good (classy) potty humor... which naturally makes me a huge fan of Belgian artist, Wim Delvoye. The more I learn of his work, the more I fall in love with this guy. He has an incredible way with the subject matter that takes the yucky/gross/ew and turns it into beautiful/gasp/giggle! I'm particularly taken by his series of "anal kisses."

 Anal Kiss A 15 (left) and A11 (right), 1999
53 x 44 cm (framed)
lipstick on hotel stationery

Aren't they great?! I would LOVE to get my hands on a copy of this book - a collection of Delvoye's earliest work, completed between the ages of 3-6. I can only image what awesomeness it might contain. This is now at the top of my Christmas list!

This puzzle too! Oh boy... gotta have this! hahaha! 

drawing (droodling)

Added on by Jourdan.
3" x 8"
ink on paper

I'm onto some new-ish things in the studio. This drawing above is the start of something. It's primarily serving as one of many studies for some larger paintings I plan to do with polyurethane and oil paint... so we'll see about that! I've been looking at a lot of photos online of skin... all kinds of photos... but the really zoomed in ones of skin layers are by far the best. I found these at sciencephoto.com 



WOW!

rocks that wow

Added on by Jourdan.
I think it's time I learn some more about geology. It's more aesthetic than I ever realized.


Yesterday I spent some time with the rocks in DC's Natural History Museum. I've been to the museum twice since moving to DC, but for some reason the dinos and dead animals always seem to take precedence. My friend Julia and I ventured upstairs this time to catch a glimpse at the Hope Diamond (though I still don't know what's so great about it) and found ourselves amongst the most incredible rocks/minerals/crystals we'd ever seen. I could've spent ages in that room just ooh-ing and ahh-ing at all the gorgeous forms and colors. It's amazing to think that all these things have formed naturally over time. So outrageous. Seeing them all has given me lots to think about - especially concerning the idea of the "organic." I've always thought of rocks as being so stationary (contrary to my impression of the organic) but after seeing how they grow into such incredible forms, I can't help but consider them organisms themselves.



I saw a lot of things that reminded me of elements and materials used in my own work. For example, there's a striking resemblance between this lava rock and this "Folded Flesh" painting I did last year...


Concravity

Added on by Jourdan.

Here are some images of my most recent undertaking... a site-based installation for Prologue, our 1st-year MFA show. So far this semester, I've been working on a smaller scale in my studio, so this was a great chance for me to go big!

In my work recently, I've been thinking about the similarities between "home" and flesh. Through the use of these re-purposed materials used in building a house (insulation) as well as turning a house into a home (moving boxes), this installation is an exploration of the barriers created by both home and flesh. The form was built with the following juxtapositions in mind: interior/exterior, comfort/discomfort, and attraction/intimidation.




 October 2011
cardboard, hot glue, fiberglass insulation, and polyurethane



a little something

Added on by Jourdan.
This week I've been continuing some research for a project that I've been working on for the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art. I've been serving as a research assistant ("Special Projects Associate" to be specific) to the Halsey's director and curator Mark Sloan for a book proposal/traveling exhibition that's in the works. The project involves the work of Mr. Don ZanFagna, a multi-talented man in his 80's currently living in Mt. Pleasant, SC.

  CLICK HERE to learn more about Mr. ZanFagna

As part of my research, I've been reading up on "Organic Architecture." I've read cover to cover Javier Senosiain's Bio-Architecture, as well as heavily skimmed several others on the subject, and I've come across some ideas and quotes that are particularly relevant in my personal studio work (which shares some aesthetic & conceptual qualities with ZanFagna's). I can't seem to get the following quote, by Frank Lloyd Wright, out of my head. It's taking me somewhere I have been headed for some time... 
Every house is a mechanical forgery of the human body... the whole inside is a sort of stomach that attempts to digest objects, objets d'art perhaps, but objects nonetheless. Here is where the feigned affliction installs itself, always hungry for more objects or plethoric because of excess. It seems like the whole life of the common house is a form of indigestion, an unhealthy body that suffers slight illnesses, that demands constant repairs and remedies to survive. It is a marvel that we, its occupants, are not driven crazy in it and with it; perhaps it is a sort of insanity we have put into it.
 I'm thinking a lot about that quote and how Wright's ideas fit into my body of work/area of interest. I'm excited about the possibilities. Oh yea, and I pulled out some materials today. I've been sitting on my hands for the past few weeks, but I think it's time to start playing around - to see some ideas come to life. The above image is the result of today's toilings.

spencer tunick

Added on by Jourdan.

I recently watched one of the documentaries on photographer, Spencer Tunick. This one, called "Naked World," followed Spencer to all seven continents to photograph naked people in each. I've also seen "Naked States," in which he does the same in all 50 US states. A pretty neat idea, although I find the actual process and the final product to be much more interesting than the films.

Spencer Tunick's photographs serve as documentation for his site-specific installations of masses of naked people in public spaces. Though the photo itself is the end product, the art piece is made up of the entire event, which requires much planning and often turns into quite the production for all involved parties. It becomes a sort of performance, particularly in the way that it involves hundreds, often thousands, of participants.

Tunick states on his website that "the individuals en masse, without their clothing, grouped together metamorphose into a new shape. The bodies extend into and upon the landscape like a substance. These grouped masses which do not underscore sexuality become abstractions that challenge or reconfigure one's views of nudity and privacy."

I love the way he uses the flesh as raw material, as if the bodies are the blocks with which he is building.


His photos take on a wide range of aesthetics and emotions. Some are dark, others are humorous. Some are rigid, while others are amorphous. Some I enjoy more than others.